Setting Thesaurus Template: Garage

Sight

Concrete floor with cracks in it, tire tread tracks, dirt, gravel, mud, dust, pegboard with tools, roll of orange extension cord hanging from a nail, steps or a landing, shelves packed with ice skates, golf sports equipment, power tools (drill, circular saw, sander, etc), hockey pucks, gold balls, old broken light fixtures, boxes, a collection of oils, grease &…

Sounds

grinding, sawing, buzzing torc noise from a drill, scuffed footsteps on the dirty floor, car doors opening and closing, vehicles starting up, the metal clink of someone sorting through a toolbox, running up or down stairs, creaky doors, the shudder and thump of a garage door closing, music from a radio, voices, noise from the street (cars, kids playing, lawns…

Smells

oil, gas, hot motors, sweat, dust, dirt, cold cement, fresh cut grass smell wafting in from outside, fertilizer, grease, WD40

Tastes

saliva, beer, coffee, pop, water, dust, bag of chips, grit in the teeth from the dirt in the garage

Touch

brushing powdery dust from the hands, wiping hands on a grease rag, sorting through a toolbox for a socket size or wrench, feeling the cold steel in the palm, pain from blisters, cuts and scrapes, sweat gathering on forehead and clinging to neck, sneezing at the dust motes in the air, lugging a box out of the way, the vibration in the hand and arm when using…

Helpful hints:–The words you choose can convey atmosphere and mood.

Example 1: After loading the empty paint cans in the back of the truck, I set my sights on the collection of broken hockey sticks lining the far wall like giant toothpicks. I didn’t care what Mark said about collecting them to make a bench. They’d been sitting there forever and I was sick of looking at them…

–Similes and metaphors create strong imagery when used sparingly.Example 1: (Simile) Dad fired up the truck. A rattly, smokey blast shot out the tailpipe like the cough of a dedicated chain smoker…

Think beyond what a character sees, and provide a sensory feast for readers

Logo-OneStop-For-Writers-25-smallSetting is much more than just a backdrop, which is why choosing the right one and describing it well is so important. To help with this, we have expanded and integrated this thesaurus into our online library at One Stop For Writers. Each entry has been enhanced to include possible sources of conflict, people commonly found in these locales, and setting-specific notes and tips, and the collection itself has been augmented to include a whopping 230 entries—all of which have been cross-referenced with our other thesauruses for easy searchability. So if you’re interested in seeing a free sample of this powerful Setting Thesaurus, head on over and register at One Stop.

The Setting Thesaurus DuoOn the other hand, if you prefer your references in book form, we’ve got you covered, too, because both books are now available for purchase in digital and print copies. In addition to the entries, each book contains instructional front matter to help you maximize your settings. With advice on topics like making your setting do double duty and using figurative language to bring them to life, these books offer ample information to help you maximize your settings and write them effectively.

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About ANGELA ACKERMAN

Angela is an international speaker and bestselling author who loves to travel, teach, empower writers, and pay-it-forward. She also enjoys dreaming up new tools and resources for One Stop For Writers, a library built to help writers elevate their storytelling.
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13 Responses to Setting Thesaurus Template: Garage

  1. Pingback: Setting Thesaurus Entry Collection | Writers Helping Writers

  2. As always Angela, very helpful. You are single-handedly keeping me from going nuts while I revise my new YA.

  3. Black widows! They may be unique to my part of the world, but so many garages here harbor them in the dark corners. *shivers*
    Thanks again, Angela. I love these templates.

  4. A-maze-ing. As always.

    I have an award for you at my blog. 🙂

  5. I always love your examples!

  6. Angela says:

    Thanks Stephanie!

    Stina, I felt like adding onto the entry. “Honest–my garage does not look like this!”

    (but I’ve seen plenty that are ultra-scary!)

    Mary, thanks! I like to turn things into monsters whenever possible. 🙂

    Karen, Thanks so much!

    Bish–I agree, the mechanic’s garage or workshop is much different. Same thing for car aficionados. I saw one garage that looked like a ‘room of the house’ with big screen TV, black and white marble tiling, chrome everywhere, etc. He spend tons of time on his classic car rebuilds, so he wanted comfort.

    Kirsten I am BLUSHING! Thanks!

    Thanks Jenna. I learn so much from other writers and if I can give back in this small way, I’m happy. 🙂

  7. Very much appreciate the time and effort put into this website.

  8. What a great concept for a blog. So original! And your writing shines, too.

  9. Bish Denham says:

    When I think of garage I automatically think of a mechanics garage, a place load with benches of tools, tool boxes, tools and parts hanging on the walls,parts on shelves, tires, car lifts, big basins of oil and other engine fluids, cases of oil, and a ton of other stuff. I think you could “easily” do a whole ‘nuther one on a Mechanics Shop. Not that you don’t have enough ideas all ready!:O

  10. Karen Lange says:

    Always good stuff! Thanks:)
    Have a good weekend,
    Karen

  11. Mary Witzl says:

    GREAT simile and metaphor. Every time I come here I start seeing the need to use more of these in my own writing. For some reason, I don’t think to do this, and yet these are such effective immages. I can just hear that awful, throaty cough and see that gaping mouth of horrors.

  12. This is especially useful since we don’t have a garage. Maybe that’s partly why I’ve never written a scene that takes place in one. All I remember of my parents’ garage was that it was a complete disaster. That plus it was a perfect place to hid Christmas presents. No one was brave (or stupid) enough to search through it. 🙂

    Can’t wait to see the next thesaurus post!

  13. Your posts are SO helpful. Thank you so much.

    Stephanie

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