Suggestion Box

writershelpingwriters_logo_6x6inch_final_optHave an idea for a new Thesaurus Collection you’d like to see? Pining for a special Tool or Resource? Have an entry for an existing thesaurus that is on your Wish List?

Or maybe you’d just like to leave us a comment about how we’re doing. We’d love to hear from you!

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Jeremy Bursey
Jeremy Bursey
1 month ago

My copy of The Occupation Thesaurus arrived in the mail a few days ago, and I’ve been going through the opening chapters and appendices of all the current Thesaurus books on the lead-up to reading it, to refresh my memory on each entry’s advice, and as much as I like each Thesaurus, I like the connection each one has to one another even more. I’m glad that my copy of The Emotion Thesaurus also informs entries on The Emotional Wounds Thesaurus, The Negative Traits Thesaurus, as well as The Occupations Thesaurus, and vice versa, while The Negative Traits and Positive Traits directly balance each other, and The Occupations Thesaurus ties in with the two Settings Thesauruses, revealing the hidden genius of how these books create a network of ideas for writing and planning help. This is why I think all of the books are useful, and why I appreciate the articles leading up to the entries in each book, and why I can see myself rereading them before starting new projects. It’s also why I look forward to each new book you release.

That said, I’ve also been reading the comments on the Thesaurus blog posts throughout this site, and I’ve found that the common response to book requests is that the Thesaurus has to have enough demand to get turned into a book, so I thought I’d quickly give my list of preferences for “The Next Thesaurus” to add to that demand.

I echo the majority of visitors on this site that I’d like to see them all turned into books. But I also know that won’t be possible, so my current Top 3 (in order) are Character Motivations, Conflict, and Skills & Traits. I’d actually prefer Skills & Traits first since it would complement Occupations quite well, but I notice it doesn’t have as many entries as Character Motivations has (and that you’ve recently added a few new entries to One Stop a few months ago), and allowing for more time to add more entries would make it better later, so it’s officially my third preference after Character Motivations (I’m terrible at coming up with wants and goals for my protagonists) and Conflict (a truly great Thesaurus that I want now but have to wait until it’s finished, hence why it’s behind Motivations instead of ahead of it). At some point, I’d also like to see Shapes, Colors, Textures, and Symbols combined into a single volume, because they, too, would be great for the bookshelf, but that would be after the other three: It seems like the patterns in particular are still light on entries (I only see two, and checkered and leopard-skin are not among them, and I’m only assuming “spotted” is the same as polka-dotted), so it would make sense to wait on them until there’s not really anything left to add.

So, this brings me to suggestions for future topics. I admit I’m light on ideas, but I do sense your preference is for topics that complement other topics, so here’s what I’d like to see integrated into the collection someday as a means to keep to the trend:

The Food and Beverage Thesaurus (Book):
-Focuses on “core” foods and drinks like beef, poultry, candy, water, wine, etc.
-Lists the common foods and drinks for that type (beef: hamburger, steak, filet mingon, etc.; wine: red, white, blush, etc.)
-Covers the emotional ties that characters have to food and drink
-Covers the conflicts one might create by consuming said food or drink
-Describes the types of places they’ll likely appear (not just restaurants, bars, or grocery stores, but also sports arenas, school cafeterias, etc.)
-Describes the occasions one might eat or drink this item (breakfast, lunch, dinner, birthday party, holiday, etc.)
-Describes the packaging or presentation: packaged, boxed, bottled, sliced, on a plate, etc.
-Associated tastes, textures, and smells (salty, sweet, meaty, oak, sulfuric, etc.)
-Describes how the character might feel after consumption (sugar rush, brain freeze, drunk, heavy, guilty, etc.)
-Describes how food might originate (garden, cow, harvested, butchered, etc.)
-Describes the person “making” the food or beverage

The Traditions Thesaurus (Maybe Book):
-Focuses on holidays, customs, and traditions around the world, in history (and maybe in fiction–Festivus anyone?).
-Ties into other Thesaurus topics including:
-Emotional ties and/or wounds (Smell of Christmas cookies, Wife kissed Santa Claus, etc.)
-Traditional settings (park, banquet hall, church, Chuck E. Cheese, etc.)
-Associated foods and beverages (Food and Beverage Thesaurus!!!)
-Associated clothing (future Clothing Thesaurus?)
-Associated conflicts
-Physical requirements (putting up a Christmas tree, decorating a cake, etc.)
-Potential costs (buying ingredients for cake, buying a plane ticket, etc.)
-Examples in Movies or Literature (National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation; Planes, Trains, and Automobiles; The Purge … okay, maybe not that last one)

The Genre Thesaurus (One Stop):
-Focuses on BISAC genres, Save the Cat genres, and other familiar types
-Discusses common character professions or positions for genre (detective: mystery, lawyer: thriller, deliveryman: romance, high school student: coming of age, etc.)
-Discusses common archetypes for genre (reluctant hero, superhero, etc.)
-Common settings for genre (police station: thriller, castle: adventure or romance, etc.)
-Common weather effects and symbols for genre (fog/rope: thriller, rain/cat: noir, sunshine/picnic basket: romantic comedy, etc.)
-Common cliches (woman in the red dress: thriller, man without the shirt: gambling…I mean romance, etc.)
-Associated moods (lighthearted: comedy, emotional: drama, adrenaline: action)
-Whatever else is important

And because I mentioned it in another suggestion:

The Clothing Thesaurus (Book):
-Type (hat, shoe, shirt, etc.)
-Category (casual, formal, swimwear, etc.)
-Materials (thread, leather, cotton, etc.)
-Sensory details (light to touch, airy, smells like mothballs, etc.)
-Trending era (1920s, 1980s, always, etc.)
-Associated profession (tennis player, businessman, any profession, etc.)
-Protection against weather types (raincoat protects against rain)
-Associated tradition (religious ceremony, graduation, nontraditional, etc.)
-Character type likely to wear it (adventurer may wear a hat)
-Reasons why character may wear this (going swimming, going to a picnic, trying to impress somebody, etc.)
-Reasons why a character wouldn’t wear this (afraid of the water, afraid of loose straps, can’t work a zipper, etc.)

And a related topic:

The MacGuffin Thesaurus (One Stop):
-Focuses on common MacGuffin types (murder weapon, nuclear bomb, lost jewel, etc.)
-MacGuffin by genre (mystery, thriller, adventure, etc.)
-MacGuffin by location (mansion, city park, deep cave, etc.)
-Ways to subvert expectations (murder weapon: a computer keyboard; location: in a cave; genre: romantic comedy; reality: protagonist is a love-starved teenager playing a massively multiplayer role-playing fantasy game while his love interest is the ambitious girl he just KO’ed in the cave while trying to be the first to the diamond)
-MacGuffin as symbol for inner conflict (stopping the bomb is symbolic of the character’s need to stop destroying his reputation at work)
-Probably doesn’t need much else.

Finally, and probably overkill, but:

The Action Thesaurus (One Stop):
-Basically a reverse Emotion Thesaurus for additional indexing
Example: “Running Away”
-Emotion (fear, self-preservation)
-Personality Trait (negative, cowardly; positive, wise)
-Literal Common Triggers (animal, police, gunman)
-Figurative Common Triggers (bad relationship, responsibility, fear of failure)
-Escalation/De-escalation/Starts As/Leads To

Okay, I think that’s enough for the next decade. Thanks again for making these books and running One Stop. These are all amazing resources. I’m grateful for each of them. Hopefully all of this is already in the notes.

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bursey

Wow! What a great list of resources you’ve come up with! I’m so glad you’re finding our books and One Stop for Writers useful. That’s our top priority, so it makes our day to hear that we’ve achieved that goal for individual writers.

We will absolutely take your suggestions into account as we move forward. Some of these we have considered but haven’t been able to see how they could be satisfactorily fleshed out into a book format. We’ve found that some things work better as books and some work better as online tools or references. For this reason, we’re currently in discussion about a few of these and how we might adapt them to be incorporated at One Stop for Writers. When we’ve come to a consensus on exactly what that will look like and pull the trigger, we’ll share our plans in a One Stop newsletter, so if you haven’t signed up for those, you might want to: https://onestopforwriters.com/newsletter.

Thanks again for letting us know what you’d like to see! We’ll keep these in mind. Have a great day!

Kim Howard
Kim Howard
2 months ago

Thank you for such great references for new authors!

I just finished the book “Save the Cat Writes a Novel” by Jessica Brody. I am one week into the two week free trial of One Stop for Writers (which I love!) and I was wondering you have any plans to create a scene template for the 15 beats? I know you have the Michael Hauge scene template. I haven’t read his book yet as it seems to be catered to screenwriters. Just hoping maybe you’ll consider adding a new scene template. Thanks!

Jaclyn Roche
3 months ago

Hello The Main Conflict Thesaurus page doesn’t list all the entry posts you’ve made. Is there an updated page that you can point me to?

https://writershelpingwriters.net/conflict-thesaurus/

Wynkies
Wynkies
6 months ago

Um, when you publish a type of conflict on your blog (ie, a “conflict thesaurus entry” on your blog like today’s post), how’s about adding a link to it on your Conflict Thesaurus blog page? That would make it easy for folks to keep finding it! (Yes, I realize this is a “duh” and probably just a teensy oversight on your part.) Thanks!

jeff
jeff
7 months ago

Hello Angela,

I’m Gen Psych Professor at a local private and I just came across the concept and word Character Wound because one of our psychiatrists used the term; however, I am wondering if your terms have been validated by research measures. You may have conducted extensive research already and my question will feel naive. I believe that valid terms and designations do exist outside of DSM or ICD(like co-dependency). However, is their construct validity with this term like CW being correlated with PCL-C or Dissociative indexes?

Thanks for responding.

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
7 months ago
Reply to  jeff

Hi, Jeff. Thanks for reaching out with your question. The term “wound” is one we came up with to describe the past trauma a character may have experienced that has gotten them stuck somehow in their current life. As authors (rather than mental health experts) we did a lot of research into the psychology of wounds to understand how they tend to work in reality, because we wanted authors to be able to write fiction and characters that mirrored real life. As such, we didn’t seek to correlate our terms with the indexes you’ve mentioned—though, of course, it’s possible that those connections exist :). Does that answer your question?

jeff
jeff
7 months ago
Reply to  BECCA PUGLISI

Becca,

Thanks for responding. And I definitely appreciate your efforts in developing a Taxonomy for the phenomena of wounds! I teach general psych and approach my question the way I teach my students in psychology to: ask questions, investigate methods, seek data. I really appreciate ‘outside efforts’ to establish validity and descriptive accuracy of what people are going through. I understand that answering my question about research might cross proprietary lines about sources. I’m still curious about methods you used and you may answer me at jeffortman7@gmail.com if you wish to 🙂 respond privately. Thanks again for responding to my question.

Robin
Robin
10 months ago

Why do authors insist on writing huge books about “tight” writing?!!!
Will Strunk said, “Omit needless words!” “Make every word tell!” And a famous French architect said, “Less is more”.
Hell…I wish those ‘writers’ would get on ‘that’ bloody program!

Sunny
Sunny
10 months ago

Hi, I absolutely love your thesaurus collection, it’s been such a valuable resource over the years, I don’t know what I’d do without it! I recently downloaded the urban setting thesaurus, excited to have finally found the perfect reference to help me with this one specific setting I’ve been struggling to write. And thus I learned an important lesson about checking the table of contents before whipping out the credit card, because it just so happens that one specific setting is the one location that doesn’t crop up anywhere in the pages (jk, I’ve learned no such lesson, this book is great and I have no regrets, impulse shopping has once again emerged victorious, eyes closed, head first, can’t lose XD).

Then I recently saw that you guys published a second edition of the emotion thesaurus with added entries, and I was wondering if the other thesauruses might end up getting revamped as well? If so, let me be the first (or not, I didn’t exactly scroll through all the previous messages here, there very well may be hundreds of people requesting different settings, but I am lazy and my shields of narcissistic denial are strong so if I’m not aware of there existence they obviously do not exist) to offer a suggestion for the urban setting thesaurus: ROOFTOPS

I feel like a lot of people would find an entry on rooftops incredibly useful; I know I, for one, know pretty much diddly squat about them. City rooftops are not a location a lot of people can easily access, and if you are in a city, and the building you’re in does happen to have roof access, it’s oftentimes restricted. And I can tell you from personal experience that trying to research this subject is a headache of slogging through hundreds of hotel/restaurant/condo sites advertising their luxury rooftops pools/bars/etc (Which, granted, can be useful depending on what you’re looking to write, but sometimes you want your character to be able to crouch on some rooftop overlooking the old abandoned meat-packing district to spy on a clandestine deal happening below without him having to wade through a heated infinity pool or getting interrupted by a cocktail waiter looking to take his order, ya know?). Now, with some highly-skilled google-fu you might be able to narrow down the search enough to learn about city roofs from a constructional point of view, you know, the materials, the technical terms, etc., and while that’s slightly more helpful, I’m stymied by the fact that as a non-construction worker my practical experience with these things is limited. I may learn the name of a material often used in the construction of roofs, but I still don’t know what that material looks like/how it smells/the feel of it under your feet/how it might look after years of wear and tear and countless cigarette butts ground into it beneath the shoes of underpaid workers sneaking out for a quick smoke/etc.

So yeah, I guess that was my long rambling way of saying that if you ever were thinking publishing a second edition of the urban setting thesaurus, I would love it if there were an entry on city rooftops! 🙂

(And if you feel you don’t have enough additional settings to justify a second edition, I will gladly spew more ideas at you ;D)

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Sunny

Hi, Sunny. I’m so glad to know that you were happy with your purchase. To answer your first question about other second editions, we don’t have any more of those in the works. We chose that for the Emotion Thesaurus because, since it was our first book, it was pretty small, and we knew we could do more with it. The other books are pretty sizable already, and making them bigger makes it more difficult to keep the price reasonable, so 2nd editions probably aren’t going to happen for them.

As for your Urban Rooftop setting, that’s a great entry—especially the kind of rooftop that would be used for clandestine purposes, like spying on someone or running from the authorities. The tough thing about publishing a book is that we can’t go back and add content very easily. But that’s one thing we’re loving about One Stop for Writers: we can add whatever we want to whenever we want to :). So we will be adding this to our list of entries to write—which, I have to say, is getting pretty long. So it might be a while before we’re able to get to this one, but it will definitely be there eventually. Thanks again for telling us what you think about our products and letting us know what would be most useful for you.

Sunny
Sunny
10 months ago
Reply to  BECCA PUGLISI

Awesome, I’ll keep my eyes open for it! 😀

Jovan Ivančević
Jovan Ivančević
10 months ago

As Serbian writting in English, but lacking in fluid English I am in problem because my stories lack of final touch. Most stories I have created are full of irony and, as history fun, I like to mix amd mash different epochs, like in stories “The NEw Gods”, or ” Julius Caesar VS Napoleon”. I about to try to create Odyssey~s journey in novel fashion. My question is do you have any writer out there who would tackle with mine ideas for mutual benefits?
Sincerelly Yours

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
10 months ago

Hi, Jovan. If I understand your question correctly, you’re looking for a partner to either share the writing of your stories or help you polish them up so they’re clean. If this is right, have a look at the Recommended Writing Communities section of our Resources for Writers page. There, you can find a community that matches the type of book you’re writing and can reach out to see if there’s anyone who might be willing to partner up. Best of luck!

Lauren
Lauren
11 months ago

Idea for a thesaurus! Maybe a Physical Injury and Wound one? Detailing different types of injuries (head injuries, stab wounds, etc) and maybe even wounds that don’t result from a fight (botched surgery/abortion leading to bleeding, poisoning, etc) and the consequences of what would happen and any possible psychological trauma that comes with it.

Lauren
Lauren
11 months ago

Thanks for taking the time to reply! Do you by chance know of any useful blog sites with such information?

Wynkies
Wynkies
6 months ago
Reply to  Lauren

Try looking at Writers Digest books, and source books for murder mystery writers. Eg, there are books about guns, forensics, and the like. I would not be surprised to find a medical type book among them.

Robbi Sommers Bryant

How about a power verb thesaurus?

D. T. Nelson
1 year ago

The emotional wound thesaurus has been quite useful in helping me solidify some of my characters’ motivations. However, there are several “wounds” that seem to be missing. Granted, it is impossible to cover every contingency, and some situations are so unique and specific to a small selection within a single genre (e.g. experiencing death and being resurected by a necromancer) that one can be forgiving for not including them. However, there are a few that were surprisingly absent given their common occurance. You have death of a parent and oneself receiving news of a terminal illness, and the chronic illness of a sibling. But what about the long term terminal illness of a parent (the slow deteriaration and inevitable death)? You include the character who experience the betrayal of a sibling. This can be used as a starting place to adjust to betrayal by a parent, or friend. But what of the wound received by the person who did the betraying—whether through anger or in the belief they were saving the person’s life? Perhaps there is enough material out there to write The Emotional Wound Thesaurus 2.

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  D. T. Nelson

Thanks so much for letting us know your thoughts about this thesaurus. It’s something Angela and I constantly worry about—the idea that we could write a thesaurus and end up leaving important entries out. Obviously, none of our books are comprehensive; we know we can’t cover everything. But it’s always good to hear from writers what kinds of entries would like to see.

While nothing is certain, I can say that we currently don’t have plans for a second Wound Thesaurus. The content in that book was so heavy; it was definitely the most difficult to write. It’s possible that we may add a few entries here and there to the Wound Thesaurus at One Stop for Writers, since it’s easy to add content there (which we wouldn’t be able to do in our existing book). So thanks again for the suggestions.

D T Nelson
1 year ago
Reply to  BECCA PUGLISI

I know there are many writers who like the online resources like yours, but I find reference books on the shelf beside my computer far more useful and time-saving. (I also abhor the more costly subscription model for most things. It’s why I no longer use MS Word or any of the Adobe products like Photoshop) However, after looking the resource over I noticed in you have some additional “Settings” entires for speculative fiction. As a writer of fantasy (and other speculative fiction) this would be something I would definitely like to see in book form.

I’ve already purchased the Emotion Thesaurus and Emotional Wound Thesaurus, but I’ve been going back and forth about purchasing the Urban and Rural Setting books because so much of it wouldn’t apply to my writing (though I will likely buy them in the end).

A Speculative Fiction Setting Thesaurus with 120+ entries that encompassed a combination of urban and rural settings, multiple climates (arctic, desert, forest, ocean, mountain, etc), and explored multiple “old world” flavors beyond the standard European Middle Ages (i.e. Asian, Middle Eastern, African) would be something I, and many other speculative fiction writers, would jump at the chance to own (as would writers of historical fiction, I would think) I don’t know how much time I’ve spent searching out the sensory experiences like the feeling of the air near a blacksmith forge, the smell of a tannery, the sounds and motion of an old wooden ship on rough seas, guessing at the sights and aromas of an apothecary’s shop, the sounds and feelings of running through an African rainforest at night, and speculating on the sensory overload of walking through a crowded middle eastern bazaar.

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  D T Nelson

Hi, DT. When we wrote the Setting Thesauruses, Angela and I discussed the possibility of a spec fiction volume. There are definitely enough to fill out a book, though it probably wouldn’t be as big as the others. Publishing two volumes at once almost killed us, so a third was out of the question ;). When it comes to our choices of what to publish next, we have to look at many factors, including what would help the widest array of authors, what would fill a gap in the market, etc. We haven’t ruled out a speculative setting thesaurus, but it’s not at the top of our list. It’s very possible we’ll do this at some point down the road, but if it happens, it will likely be a while. Sorry to not have better news, but I’d rather be as forthright about it as possible. Thanks for letting us know what would be helpful for you.

Rebecca
Rebecca
1 year ago

I absolutely love your thesaurus books! I can’t stop singing their praises on social media. These books have helped me through some ruts in my novella I’m currently working on, as well as my short stories. They have really helped me gain confidence in my writing.

I love and agree with all the comments on an era/historical setting thesaurus. I would also like to see a thesaurus on mental health disorders. I know you touch upon that in the Emotional Wound Thesaurus, but I’d love to see a book or post that really fleshes mental health disorders out. Maybe even on how they not only affect adults, but children who suffer from, or knows someone who has them as well.

Thank you so much for creating these awesome books again! 🙂

Dominique
Dominique
1 year ago

A hot air balloon setting would be a cool idea. I had a writing prompt just not about that and have never actually BEEN in one myself, although I can imagine the idea of it. I checked my books because for some reason I thought it was in there but nope then checked here and nope! lol. I don’t know how often it would be used but it just came up so I thought, hey why not, I’ll add a suggestion.

Vince
1 year ago

Congratulations on your new release. I have all your thesaurauses and look forward to read this one. Thanks for your efforts.

Nathan Chamberland
Nathan Chamberland
1 year ago

Hi there! I love your work and find it indespensable! Thank you!

I had an idea that would save tremendous time for writers: An Era Thesaurus. A way to get all the senses from the period. Manners of speech and popular terms could be included. Wardrobe, class styles, music, art, famous people of that era, etc. It could be separated by decade going backwards and when going far back enough, it could be categorized in full eras (Victorian, Edwardian, etc.).

I know I’m not going to write it myself, and for someone else other than you to write it just seems wrong.

I hope that idea is worth something to you. I’m sure it would be worth so much to so many if it came to fruition.

I’d love to know what you think.

Cheers!

Nathan Chamberland

Annette Larwood
Annette Larwood
1 year ago

I would like to see a fashion designer profile added, thanks

Abigail
Abigail
1 year ago

I was looking through the Emotional Wound Thesaurus and couldn’t find quite what I wanted (which is OK, I still love the book!). I’m creating a character who, it turns out, suffers from the high expectations of her parents and those around her. (Think “The Cutting Edge”.) It’s similar to parents loving conditionally and being so beautiful no one sees anything else—having immense talent and really supportive parents who nevertheless don’t make it quite clear that they’ll love her whether or not she meets the sky-high expectations of everyone around her. I’m not sure if that’s different enough to warrant its own entry, but it’s a suggestion! 🙂

Abigail
Abigail
1 year ago

Thanks! I missed seeing your reply earlier, but I’ll check that one out!

Steen Comer
1 year ago

Hey there,

I would love to pre-order the Emotional Thesaurus, but I definitely want it in PDF rather than kindle form. Is there any way I can give you money for that now?

Thanks,
Steen

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Steen Comer

Hi Steen. I’m so glad you’re interested in preordering the second edition of The Emotion Thesaurus. Unfortunately, we just don’t have a preorder option for this format. We tried to make it available across as many versions as possible, but our PDF distributor doesn’t currently offer this capability. And if we tried to do it ourselves, well…this is why we have a distributor, lol. With my luck and all the things we’ve got going on, I would forget to send you your copy on the 21st, and that would be awful. One thing I can suggest, though, is to sign up for our Future Releases Newsletter (https://twitter.us20.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=cc1cb11597b48d3f26dd7e1c3&id=f6515a7617). This one only goes out when we’ve got a new book releasing, so you’d be informed via email when the book (and the PDF version) is officially available for purchase.

Steen
Steen
1 year ago
Reply to  BECCA PUGLISI

Great! I understand the challenges here. I will sign up posthaste, and I look forward to giving you money as soon as possible!

Emma Gaulton
Emma Gaulton
1 year ago

What about having all the thesaurus’ available as a PDF download to purchase? Say US$9.99 each? I know I would buy occupations, weather, physical features to name just a few.

Eva Calderon
1 year ago

I love everything you do! I read all of your posts and I have all of your thesauruses. I just have one suggestions – I think it would be great if you could add “tools of the trade” to the information on each occupation in the occupations thesaurus. This would help writers write metaphors and similes that a person with that occupation would use. It could also help with setting – what kind of things would that person carry in their backpack, briefcase, have on their desk, or in their home etc.

Jamie
Jamie
1 year ago

Your setting guides are great, but one that I would love to get my hands on is a dystopian setting guide. Same types of settings, but what they might be like after years of decay and abandonment.

Alecia R Walker Newbom
Alecia R Walker Newbom
1 year ago

Hello Angela and Becca. I am so amazed and grateful for the extremely detailed and extensive work you do to help other writers succeed. Thank you so much for dedicating your time and hard work to these many projects. I don’t know how you do it!

Would it be possible for you to add entries in your Occupation Thesaurus for the following two occupations?

1) Outdoor Survival Skills Instructor

2) Search and Rescue Volunteer or full-time worker

Even if the second one is a volunteer occupation, it could be the main occupation of someone who supports it as their true calling, either by working a second job, or possibly someone who doesn’t have to have a side job because they are able to live off of an inheritance.

My WIP’s main character is a highly-driven, over-acheiver, trying to compensate for a tragic loss for which he blames himself. He seeks redemption or absolution through his choice of occupation. He is a part-time English teacher in an accelerated program for highschool students who take some of their classes at the local Community College. He works the rest of the time as an Outdoor Survival Instructor, and is an on-call Search and Rescue volunteer on weekends. I am getting overwhelmed by my research into the secondary occupations, and would be very grateful to have a reasonably thorough, yet succinct summary of both of the secondary occupations and all of the things that you cover with your descriptions of other occupations in your Occupation Thesaurus. Thanks so much for considering my request.

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
1 year ago

Thanks for the kind words, Alecia! I’m glad you’re finding our resources useful. I’ll add these two to our list of possibilities. As you can probably guess, we’ve got quite a list going already, and we won’t be able to get to everything on it. But it’s good for us to have options and to know what our readers are looking for. Have a great day!

Tyrone Bryant
Tyrone Bryant
2 years ago

Can you please write a whole book discussing characters’ desires, ambitions and goals?

Your Tait Thesauri are among the many books I’ve purchased for my Kindle devices and apps. I’m currently saving up, and considering your other works, but if you write a book solely about characters’ wants, I’ll definitely buy it.

In the meantime, thank you for the teachings you’ve been offering so far.

Becca E Jackson
Becca E Jackson
2 years ago

I am just a new subscriber but down at the comment box I don’t see a way to subscribe without leaving a comment…or subscribe in general. If you could make it a bit more intuitive, that would be super nice.

CC KOEN
2 years ago

Thank you for providing excellent resources for writers. One of the writing needs I have and struggle with is locating experts for topics related to specific themes, conditions, or situations presented in my story (i.e., doctors, police, scientists, information technology, FBI, etc.). Since your website already contains wonderful resources, I was wondering if you would consider adding a section to your website that highlights guest experts to provide a Q&A for writers.

Also, another resource that would be beneficial are forms that could be used to send to beta readers so the feedback they provide is effective and efficient. Templates that include checklists to quickly complete, open-ended questions, and other questions that focus on effective story development and improvement for effective feedback.

Thanks again for your dedication to providing invaluable tools for writers.

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
2 years ago
Reply to  CC KOEN

Hi, CC. Thanks so much for letting us know what you’d like to see here. Regarding the beta reading checklists, there are quite a few of those already, so instead of reinventing the wheel, I’d rather just share them around :). I love these because they can be tweaked to fit exactly your preferences:
https://jamigold.com/2014/08/introducing-the-beta-reading-worksheet/
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/18274464-beta-reader-checklist
https://writingcooperative.com/15-questions-to-send-beta-first-readers-please-steal-3ff9fa198b5

The list of subject matter experts is an interesting idea, so we’ll keep it in mind. In the meantime, here are some resources I found that could provide a jumping off point for anyone looking for experts:
http://www.wga.org/writers-room/on-the-web/fyi-listings-ask-the-expert
http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/questions-and-quandaries/interviewing/where-do-writers-find-experts
https://www.freelancewriting.com/feature-articles/subject-matter-experts/
https://apasseducation.com/5-great-places-to-find-subject-matter-experts/

Thanks again for letting us know what you’d like to see. This is always welcome information for us :).

Jennie
Jennie
2 years ago

How about a thesaurus of weather. The Eskimos reportedly have 22 words that characterize snow. What about various words for rain, wind, temperature, etc.

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
2 years ago
Reply to  Jennie

Hi, Jennie. You’re in luck! We have a weather thesaurus :). You can find a list of all the thesauruses in our collection here. I hope this helps.

Matthias
Matthias
2 years ago

Hello, the thesaurus series is very helpful to me. However, english is not my native language. That’s why I have to look up a lot of words.
I would suggest that the thesaurus series be published in other languages.
I would prefer German, of course. 😀
Yours
Matthias

BECCA PUGLISI
Admin
2 years ago
Reply to  Matthias

Hi, Matthias. Thanks for reaching out with your request. Our books are in the process of being published in various languages—no German as of yet, but you can see the current list here. We’d love to branch out into other languages, so if you have a lead on any German publishers who might be a good fit, we’d be happy to talk to them. I’m so glad the series is coming in handy for you.

Tony Dunbar
Tony Dunbar
2 years ago

Hi Angela-

I am newly introduced to your work and I am an immediate fan.

In fact, I am writing to inquiry about your speaker availability and fees.

I look forward to response!

Appreciatively,

AWD/tony

Ana
Ana
2 years ago

I have all your books. They are extremely helpful.
Here’s what I’d love for you to write next:
– Sci-Fi and Fantasy Settings
– Occupations

Anthony
Anthony
2 years ago

I’m in need of help. I’ve searched my collection of Thesaurus entries, but I’ve run into a brick wall.
I’m looking for help in describing the after-effects of being a prisoner who was also the recipient of experimental drug use.
Anything that would help in showing the use of syringes, days underground in a windowless cell, malnourished, and strung-out from the good/bad drug combinations.